Eurovision

#PORTUGAL: Festival da Canção SF1 #JoinUs at 22.45 CET

PORTUGAL: Festival da Canção SF1 #JoinUs at 22.45 CET

Portugal’s road to the 2020 Eurovision Song Contest starts tonight with the first of two semi-finals of Festival da Canção. Four songs from tonight will go forward to the national final on 7 March.

You can follow the action HERE.

Here we go. Eight go in, four come out. But first, plenty of chat from the stage and the Green Room.

And in less than 10 minutes, it’s onto the songs?

MEERA – Copo de gin

A band, fronted by a young lady with pink streaky hair. The song is a little bit funky. We get the old verse, chorus, verse chorus format. The crowd loves it, and is clapping along sensibly. it’s a decent opener.

Felipe Lambado – Gerbera amarela do sul

Felipe is strikingly dressed, like a medieval monarch in mourning. It’s a dark song, emphasised by the backing singers, also in mourning dress. There’s lots of twiddly instrumentation featuring which gives a funky edge. But it’s very odd, and will either sail through or sink without trace.

Ian Mucznik – O dia de amanhã

Ian goes for a ballad with piano accompaniment. Imagine a smokey bar on the backstreets of Lisbon, and a cabaret singer towards the end of the night. That’s this song. The chorus is more rousing than the verse. A pleasant song, but not a winner.

Barbára Tinoco – Passe-Partout

A park bench! Nice. A cheeky young singer? Nice. This has Parisien overtones about it. A song from the film Ratatouille? Yes. It’s a cute little song, and Barbára even sings about a certain Ms Piaf. We could be onto something here with the whole package. And I can imagine a jazz hands moment coming on. That’s through.

Half way through, so it’s Green Room time.

Blasted Mechanism – Rebellion

A band, dressed to make a statement. As a style, I can’t quite put my finger on it. It’s in English and there’s jumping around the stage. Slow verse, fast chorus, slow verse. Mixing modern instruments with something like a harpsichord. Something for everyone? Indeed.

Elisa – Medo de sentir

Another ballad now. Simply sung. Just Elisa and four backing singers. Her song is pleasant enough, but I worry that it doesn’t really go anywhere. And that might be its downfall.

JJaZZ – Agora

J-j-j-jazz by name? Well, not really. It’s a band of singers, double bass and harp. Our two singers have gone for the same theme with their clothes, which is nice. There are elements of a certain O jardim, but uptempo. A megaphone is usefully employed during the middle of the song. That was unexpected. I’m not sure about it, but the crowd love it.

Throes + The Shine – Movimento

Finally we get rap. And those sampling machine Nette Barzilai used. And lots of gyrating. Plenty of movimento, if you will. There’s a lot going on, and singing isn’t the prime concern. Is there something about it? Well, it’s different and for those liking a subtly African beat, then it could be for you. This could be a finalist.

Phew. All done in less than an hour. And four songs will go through to the final in a fortnight. But who? Barbára Tinoco and three others I think.

The lines are open for the public to decide their four of choice. And a word from our sponsors.

Whilst we’re waiting for results, we hear from the expert jurors.

More recaps, and a potted history of Portuguese music.

Voting is over. We have four finalists in there somewhere.

We’ll know who they are shortly, I’m sure.

Results!!!

Passe-partout by Barbára Tinoco

Medo de sentir by Elisa

Gerbera amarela do sul by Felipe Lambado

Movimento by Throes + The Shine

Are these the right four? Should someone else have qualified instead?

Thanks for staying the course. The second semi-final is in a week’s time.

Thanks and good night!

Author – John Stanton

Source – Eurovision Ireland

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